Broken Hearts

When they got married, it should have been for a lifetime. When they had their child, their dedication was infinite. The illness came ferociously and there is no cure. How is she supposed to contemplate a life without him? How is she to be mother and father to their child? How is the little one to grow without a father?

"Broken Hearts" - Pen over paper, mixed media.
Copyright 2011 Eni Oken

Did you know that Cancer Awareness is observed during almost every month of the year? Here is a Calendar of Cancer Awareness, according to the American Cancer Society and other sources:

  • January is National Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening month.
  • February observes the World Cancer day on the 4th.
  • March observes National Colorectal Cancer Awareness month;
  • April observes National Minority Cancer Awareness Week between April 16 and 21st and is also the National Cancer Control Month;
  • May observes Melanoma Monday on May 1st; and National Women's Check-up Day on the 14th. It is also Cancer Research Month and Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month (summer is approaching, all you sun gods!);
  • June brings the National Cancer Survivor's day on the 3rd (or first Sunday of June), and is the Men's Health/Cancer Awareness month;
  • July, smack in the middle of summer is the UV Safety Month;
  • September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness month and Childhood Cancer Month. It is also National Ovarian Cancer month, Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month and Leukemia and Lymphoma Awareness month. Whew!
  • October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month and brings the National Mammography Day on October 21st;
  • November is Lung Cancer Awareness month, Pancreatic Cancer Awareness month and (how nice!) the National Family Caregiver month -- remember those who participate with us in the macabre cancer club). Also the National Stomach Cancer Awareness month.

World Cancer Day

Did you know that the only global awareness event is the World Cancer Day, observed every year on February 4th? This day was originally created as part of the World Cancer Campaign, part of the Charter of Paris during the World Summit Against Cancer for the New Millennium, during February 4th of 2000. The goal is to promote strong cancer awareness between researchers, health-care professionals, patients, governments and other participants in the fight against this disease. It is estimated that between 2005 and 2015, in a ten-year span, about 84 million people could die of the disease if not cared for. It is one of the leading causes of death around the world.

Did you know that while the pink ribbon is the global symbol for breast cancer, the ORANGE RIBBON is the representative of child cancer?

Sources

2012 National Health Observances, National Health Information Center, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.” http://healthfinder.gov/nho/nho.asp
World Cancer Day: http://www.worldcancerday.org/
American Cancer Society: http://www.cancer.org/AboutUs/WhoWeAre/cancer-awareness-calendar
 

 

TV junkie

Remember when we were young and we actually DID things instead of watching TV all the time? What happened to that beautiful girl, full of life? Meaningless life, full of wickedness. You know you are getting old when you start longing for a time that is now gone.

"TV Junkie" - Pen drawing

©Copyright 2011 Eni Oken

Couldn't have done it without you

As one of the lucky survivors of stage 4 cancer, I owe my life largely to two components: a solid support system and new technological advancements available. If it weren't for the patience and support of family and friends, along with some preciously hand picked doctors... So choose your friends wisely, stay close to your family and loved ones and contribute to cancer fundraisers -- they may all save your life one day.

"Couldn't have done it without you" Pen drawing

© Copyright 2011 Eni Oken

Life goes on

Although cancer campaigns on awareness are abundant, it seems that most people are disinterested, jaded and even turn away from having any contact with the ill, with a "thank God it's not me" attitude. The only people who really actively participate in this macabre club and feel all of the repercussions are those who are sick, the health providers and caretakers, and the very closest of family and friends. After the initial shock, people go on with their lives, while the sick and their crew are left to deal with the hardship. "And life goes on without me" - Pen drawing, mixed media - Dec. 2011

©Copyright 2011 Eni Oken

Chemotherapy

Poison or potion, chemotherapy saves and purifies. Dreaded by most, welcome by the hopeful. Weapon of mass destruction: by annihilating everything, doesn’t it give a chance for new life to begin? "Chemotherapy"

Pen drawing & mixed media

©2012 Eni Oken

All Cut Up Rag Doll

They cut you up. They give you pills and IV’s that are supposed to save your life, but make you feel like vomiting all the time. You are scared, frightened of the worst, feel like screaming all the time. They take away your hair and your breasts, two important symbols of your femininity. On top of all that, they send you huge bills that will take years to pay. And yet, all the while, you are supposed to be thankful that they are doing all this to save your life. And sometimes, eventually, it does. But not for everybody.

Prevention is key!

The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program is a program which provides access to, as the name says, free or low-cost breast and cervical cancer screening services such as mammograms and Paps tests for low-income or uninsured women. They have been provided this service for 20 years.According to their data: since its inception, the NBCCEDP has served more than 3.9 million women, providing more than 9.8 million breast and cervical cancer screening examinations. Funded programs have diagnosed more than 52,694 breast cancers, 2,856 invasive cervical cancers, and 136,837 premalignant cervical lesions.To receive NBCCEDP screenings and other services, Federal guidelines require a woman to be underinsured or uninsured, and at or below 250 percent of the federal poverty level. They also must be between the ages of 40 and 64 for breast cancer screening, and 18 and 64 for cervical cancer screening services.

To find out more about their programs and services, including locating a screening provider, visit http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/nbccedp/.

 
 
“All cut up rag doll” Pen drawing
©Copyright 2011 Eni Oken

Greed

Purchase, purchase, consume, consume. Can't we appreciate the beauty in the world? It's all too much! "Greed" - Pen drawing & mixed media

©Copyright 2011 Eni Oken

Macabre Roulette

Some people get cancer and some don’t. Some who get cancer escape and live long healthy lives, while others are wisked away in a few months. It’s just not fair, seems like a cruel and macabre roulette.

“Macabre Roulette” Pen drawing and mixed media color © Copyright 2011 Eni Oken

Funny Flower

funnyflower01 Funny Flower doodles, using water soluble neocolor artist crayons. 17x24" on bristol paper.

Copyright 2011 Eni Oken

Fantasy House

Experimenting with Caran D'Ache Neocolor artist crayons. These are fantastic and can be dissolved with water for a great watercolor feel. Look at the detail image to see the effect. Artist Crayons over Paper, 18x24 inches.

Copyright 2011 Eni Oken

Abstract Floral

Experimenting with Caran D'Ache Neocolor artist crayons. These are fantastic and can be dissolved with water for a great watercolor feel. Look at the detail image to see the effect. Artist Crayons over Paper, 18x24 inches.

Copyright 2011 Eni Oken

Abstract Drawing

Experimenting with Caran D'Ache Neocolor artist crayons. These are fantastic and can be dissolved with water for a great watercolor feel. Look at the detail image to see the effect. Artist Crayons over Paper, 18x24 inches.

Copyright 2011 Eni Oken