Renaissance MI2 tile

Renaissance Zentangle® • enioken.com

My first Renaissance Tan tile ever: I've played with gray tiles and colored paper, but never a tan one. Was an interesting experience! I also used a tangle that is new to me, Mi2 (Mee too), deconstructed by Mimi Lempart.  

I had a particular interest in mixing this tangle with some gems, here are some of the sketches and studies:

Learn to shade Zentangle® with Eni Oken • enioken.com
Learn to shade Zentangle® with Eni Oken • enioken.com
Learn to shade Zentangle® with Eni Oken • enioken.com
Learn to shade Zentangle® with Eni Oken • enioken.com

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Here's the line-art, with bold shapes and lines:

Learn to shade Zentangle® with Eni Oken • enioken.com
Learn to shade Zentangle® with Eni Oken • enioken.com

Here's the tile, halfway shaded:

Learn to shade Zentangle® with Eni Oken • enioken.com
Learn to shade Zentangle® with Eni Oken • enioken.com

The most fun part was using a white pencil to add highlights! Here is the final tile:

Learn to shade Zentangle® with Eni Oken • enioken.com
Learn to shade Zentangle® with Eni Oken • enioken.com

Renaissance Tan Tile, 3.5 inches square, black, sepia and red pen, graphite pencil, gray marker, white and red pencil.

If I had to do a self critique, I'd say that I really like the interwoven aspect of mi2, that was good shading, but I got a little lazy on the bottom left leaves, could have worked more the shadows, just wanted to be done with it. The gems turned out pretty good, but the outline could have been a little softer, not so dark. The gems shadows turned out really nice with a touch of the pink glass shining through. I really like the layering there from the top left mi2 (gems, no sepia) to the lower right mi2 (sepia, no gems).

I want to point out that there was NO blending with the blending stump on this picture, it was all marker shaded and pencil cross hatching (craaazy), because the stump started to lift and ruin some of the paper.

Copyright 2015 Eni Oken